Zurück zum Inhaltsverzeichnis von Coleman über Parker         

 

Charlie Parker: Ko-Ko (1948 live version)

 

Track: Ko-Ko


Artist: Charlie Parker (alto sax)


CD: Complete Royal Roost Live ( Savoy )


Musicians: Charlie Parker (alto sax), Miles Davis (trumpet), Max Roach (drums), Tadd Dameron (piano), Curly Russell (bass). Composed by Charlie Parker.


Recorded: Royal Roost, New York, September 4, 1948


This is one of the slickest melodies that I've ever heard. And the manner in which it is played is just sophisticated slang at its highest level. The way the melody weaves back and forth is unreal, and Yard and Max keep this kind of motion going in the spontaneous part of the song.

 

 

I'm a big boxing fan, and I see a lot of similarities between boxing and music. To be more specific, I should say that I see similarities between boxing and music that are done a certain way. There was a point in round eight of the December 8, 2007, Floyd Mayweather, Jr. versus Ricky Hatton fight, starting with an uppercut at 0:44 of this video (2:19 of the round), and also beginning with the check left hook at 2:22 of the video (0:42 of the round) when Floyd was really beginning to open up on Ricky, hitting him with punches coming from different angles in an unpredictable rhythm. If you listen to this fight with headphones on you can almost hear the musicality of the rhythm of the punches. Mayweather was throwing body shots (i.e. punches) and head shots, all coming from different angles: hooks, crosses, straight shots, uppercuts, jabs, an assortment of punches in an unpredictable rhythm. But it's not only that Mayweather's rhythm that was unpredictable, It was also the groove that he got into.

 

In my opinion, the work of Max Roach in this performance of "Ko-Ko" is very similar to the smooth, fluent, unpredictable groove that elite fighters like Mayweather, Jr., employ. The interplay of Max's drumming with Bird's improvisation sets up a very similar feel to what I saw in Mayweather's rhythm. Near the end of "Ko-Ko," at 2:15, Max does exactly this same kind of boxer motion, accompanying the second half of Miles' interlude improvisation and continuing into Bird's improvisation, only in this case it is like a counterpoint, a conversation in slang between Yard and Max. This is a technique that is both seen and heard throughout the African Diaspora. A certain amount of trickery is involved, a slickness that is demonstrated, for example, by the cross-over dribble and other moves of athletes—for example, the 'ankle-breaking' moves of basketball player Allan Iverson. In addition to this, Max's solo just before the head out is absolutely masterful. Try listening to it at half speed if you can.


This was the first Charlie Parker recording that I ever heard, as it was the first cut on side A of an album (remember those?) that my father gave me. And I can still vividly remember my response—I had absolutely NO IDEA of what was going on in terms of structure or anything else. It all seemed so esoteric and mysterious to me, as I was previously exposed to the more explicit forms of these rhythmic devices as presented in the popular African-American music that I grew up listening to. Compared to music that I had been listening to when I was younger (before the age of 17), the detailed structures in the music of Parker and his associates were moving so much more quickly, with greater subtlety and on a much more sophisticated level than I was accustomed to. However from the beginning, while listening to this music, I did intuitively get the distinct impression of communication, that the music sounded like conversations.

 

In discussing "Ko-Ko," first of all the rhythm of the head is like something from the hood, but on Mars! In the form and movement there is so much hesitation, backpedaling, and stratification. The ever-present phrasing in groups of three and the way the melody shifts in uneven groups, dividing the 32 beats into an unpredictable pattern of 3-3-2-2-3-3-2-2-1-3-4-4. By backpedaling I mean the way that the rhythmic patterns seem to reverse in movement; for example the 8s are broken up as 3-3-2, then as 2-3-3. By hesitation I am referring to the way the next 8 is broken up as 2-2-1-3, as kind of stuttering movement.


 

The opening melody of "Ko-Ko"

Stratification is just my term for the funky nature of the melody and Max's accompaniment. With this music I always paid more attention to the melody, drums and bass; however, this song form is composed of only melody and drums, with Max's part being spontaneously composed. The way Max scrapes the brushes rhythmically across the snare, frequently pivoting in unpredictable places, adds to the elusiveness and sophistication of this performance. For example, during the head and under Miles' first interlude improvisation (starting at measure 9), Max provides an esoteric commentary, filling in a little more as Parker enters (in measure 17)—however, the beat is always implicit, never directly stated. On this rendition of "Ko-Ko," Bird's temporal sense is so strong that his playing provides the clues for the uninitiated listener to find his/her balance.

 

 

Melody of "Ko-Ko", trumpet, sax, snare & bass drum:



One rarely hears this kind of commentary from drummers, as much of today's music is explicitly stated. The way Max chooses only specific parts of the melody to use as points for his commentary is part of what makes the rhythm so mysterious. Much is hinted at, instead of directly stated. This continues in the spontaneously composed sections of this performance, as Yard plays in a way where there are very hard accents which form an interplay with Max's spacious exclamations. Punches are being mixed here, some hard, some soft, upstairs and downstairs, in ways that form a hard-hitting but unpredictable groove. I've always felt that the obvious speed and virtuosity of this music obscures its more subtle dimensions from many listeners, almost as if only the initiates of some kind of secret order are able to understand it. This kind of slickness and dialog continues throughout this performance, building in ways that ebb and flow just as in a conversation. By the way Miles plays the F in measure 28 early; based on the original 1945 studio recording with Diz and Bird playing the melody, this F should fall on the first beat of measure 29. However, Yard and Max play their parts correctly, so the still developing Miles Davis probably had trouble negotiating this rapid tempo.

 


 

Spontaneously composed music can be analyzed in a similar fashion to counterpoint, in terms of the interaction of the voices. However, it is a counterpoint that has its own rules based on a natural order and intuitive-logic—what esoteric scholar and philosopher Schwaller de Lubicz referred to as Intelligence of the Heart. Also, in my opinion, the cultural DNA of the creators of this music should be taken into account, just as you should take environment and culture into account when studying any human endeavors. Max tends to play in a way that both interjects commentary between Bird's pauses and punctuates Parker's phrases with termination figures. For a drummer to do this effectively he/she must be very familiar with the manner of speaking of the soloist in order to be able to successfully anticipate the varied expressions.

 

I have heard many live recordings where it is clear that Max is anticipating Parker's sentence structures and applying the appropriate punctuation. This is not unusual; close friends frequently finish each other's sentences in conversations. With musicians such as Parker and Roach everything is internalized on a reflex level. As this music is rapidly moving sound being created somewhat spontaneously, I believe that the foreground mental activity occurs primarily on the semantic level in the mind, while the internalized, agreed-upon syntactic musical formations may be dealt with by some other more automated process, such as theorized by the concept of the mirror neuron system. What is striking here is the level that the conversations are occurring on—these are very deep subjects! Most of the time, critics and academics discuss this music in terms of individual musical accomplishments, and don't focus enough attention on the interplay. I feel this music first and foremost tells a story. There is definitely a conscious attempt to express the music using a conversational logic. So what I am saying is that while syntax is important, semantics is primary. Too often what the music refers to, or may refer to is ignored.


 


The last half of the bridge going into the last eight before Roach's solo (at 1:32) provides one of these rhythmic voice-leading points where Max goes into his boxing thing, playing some of the funkiest stuff I've heard. Just as instructive are the vocal exclamations of the musicians and possibly some initiated members of the audience, which form additional commentary. There is so much going on in this section that you could write a book about it; an entire world of possibilities is implied, as the rhythmic relationships are far more subtle than what is happening harmonically.

 

 

2nd half of last bridge and last 8 of "Ko-Ko", Bird’s solo



 

This illustrates that on these faster pieces Yard tended to play with bursts of sentences punctuated with shorter internal groupings using hard accents, whereas Max played in a way that effectively demarcated Parker's phrases with longer groupings setting up shifting epitritic patterns*. Max sets these patterns up by repeated figures designed to impress upon the listener a particular rhythmic form, only to suddenly displace the rhythm from what the listener was conditioned to expect. The passage above is a perfect example of this, setting up a hypnotic dance of 2-3-3, only to shift the expected equilibrium with the response of 2-1-3-1-1, then continuing with a slight variation of the initial dance.




Even the vocal exclamations of the musicians and audience members participates in what I consider to be secular ritualized performances. All of these features that I mention are traits that I consider to be a kind of musical DNA that has been retained from Africa. This music's level of sophistication demanded the intellectual as well as emotional participation of musicians and non-musicians alike (when they could get into the music, which not all people could). The rate of change of each instrument is also instructive. Obviously the soloists are in the foreground playing the instruments that have the swifter motion. In the case of this particular group, the bass would be approximately half the speed of the soloist, with the drums having a mercurial and protean function. In terms of commentaries, the drummer would be the next slowest after the bass and piano, and would be providing the slowest commentary from a rhythmic point of view. However, elements of the drum part are closer to the speed of the soloist.


*The epitritic ratio is 4 against 3; that is, Max playing the 4 against slow 3 (i.e. a slow pulse which is every 3 measures of 1/1 time). This ratio is used a lot on the continent of Africa.

 

Reviewer: Steve Coleman

 Charlie Parker: Ko-Ko (1948 live version)

 

Track: Ko-Ko


Artist: Charlie Parker (alto sax)


CD: Complete Royal Roost Live ( Savoy )


Musicians: Charlie Parker (alto sax), Miles Davis (trumpet), Max Roach (drums), Tadd Dameron (piano), Curly Russell (bass). Composed by Charlie Parker.


Recorded: Royal Roost, New York,

September 4, 1948


 Das ist eine der [schlüpfrigsten / raffiniertesten] Melodien, die ich jemals gehört habe. Und die Art, wie sie gespielt wird, ist verfeinerter Slang auf höchstem Niveau. Die Art, wie die Melodie auf und ab webt, ist irreal. Und Yard [Yardbird, Bird, Charlie Parker] und Max [Roach] halten diese Art von Bewegung im spontanen Teil des Songs am Laufen.

 

Ich bin ein großer Box-Fan und sehe eine Menge Ähnlichkeiten zwischen Boxen und Musik. Um es genauer zu sagen: Ich sehe Ähnlichkeiten zwischen Boxen und Musik, die in einer gewissen Weise gemacht werden. In der 8. Runde des Box-Kampfes zwischen Floyd Mayweather jr. und Ricky Hatton am 8. Dezember 2007 gab es einen Punkt (beginnend mit einem Aufwärtsschlag bei 0:44 dieses Videos, 2:19 der Runde, und auch beginnend mit dem linken Haken bei 2:22 des Videos, 0:42 der Runde), wo Floyd begann, Ricky richtig aufzumachen, indem er ihn mit Schlägen aus verschiedenen Winkeln in einem unberechenbaren Rhythmus attackierte. Wenn man diesem Kampf mit Kopfhörern zuhört, kann man geradezu die Musikalität des Rhythmus der Schläge hören. Mayweather teilte Körper-Schläge und Kopf-Schläge aus verschiedenen Winkeln aus - Haken, gekreuzte, gerade Schläge, Aufwärtshaken, Gerade, ein Sortiment von Schlägen in einem unberechenbaren Rhythmus. Es war aber nicht nur Mayweathers Rhythmus, der unberechenbar war. Es war auch der Groove, den er hineinbrachte.

   

 

Nach meiner Meinung ist die Arbeit von Max Roach in dieser Aufnahme von „Ko-Ko“ sehr ähnlich wie der geschmeidige, flüssige, unberechenbare Groove, den Elite-Kämpfer wie Mayweather jr. einsetzen. Das Zusammenspiel von Max Schlagzeugspiel mit Birds Improvisation löst ein sehr ähnliches Feeling aus wie das, was ich in Mayweathers Rhythmus sah. Kurz vor dem Ende von „Ko-Ko“, bei 2:15, macht Max genau die gleiche Art von Boxer-Bewegung, während er die zweite Hälfte von Miles Zwischenspiel-Improvisation begleitet und in Birds Improvisation hinein fortfährt. Nur ist sie in diesem Fall wie ein Kontrapunkt, eine Konversation in Slang zwischen Yard und Max. Das ist eine Technik, die in der gesamten afrikanischen Diaspora sowohl gesehen als auch gehört wird. Es ist dabei eine gewisse Menge an Trickserei im Spiel, eine Geschicklichkeit, die sich zum Beispiel im überkreuzten Dribbling und anderen Bewegungen der Athleten zeigt – zum Beispiel in den „Knöchel-brecherischen“ Bewegungen des Basketball-Spielers Allan Iverson. Außerdem ist Maxs Solo unmittelbar vor dem Thema am Ende absolut meisterhaft. Versuch es mit halber Geschwindigkeit zu hören, wenn es dir möglich ist.

 

Das war die erste Charlie-Parker-Platte, die ich hörte. Es war das erste Stück auf der A-Seite eines Albums (erinnert ihr euch daran?), das mein Vater mir gab. Und ich kann mich noch lebhaft an meine Reaktion erinnern – ich hatte absolut KEINE IDEE von dem, was da hinsichtlich Struktur oder sonst etwas vorging. Es erschien mir alles so esoterisch und mysteriös, da ich zuvor den deutlicheren Formen dieser rhythmischen Mittel ausgesetzt war, wie sie in der populären afro-amerikanischen Musik, mit der ich aufwuchs, dargeboten werden. Im Vergleich zu der Musik, die ich gehört hatte, als ich jünger war (vor dem Alter von 17) bewegten sich die detaillierten Strukturen in Parkers Musik und seiner Mitspieler so viel schneller, mit größerer Subtilität und auf einem viel verfeinerteren Niveau als das, an was ich gewöhnt war. Allerdings hatte ich vom Beginn des Hörens dieser Musik an intuitiv den Eindruck der Kommunikation – dass die Musik wie Konversationen klingt.

 

 

Wenn man „Ko-Ko“ bespricht, dann ist zuallererst darauf hinzuweisen, dass das Thema wie etwas aus der Hood [der afro-amerikanischen Community] ist, jedoch auf dem Mars! In der Form und der Bewegung gibt es so viel Verzögerung, Zurückrudern und Schichtung. Sowie die allgegenwärtige Phrasierung in Dreier-Gruppen und die Art, wie sich die Melodie in ungleichen Gruppen verändert, indem sie die 32 Beats in unvorhersehbare Muster von 3-3-2-2-3-3-2-2-1-3-4-4 teilt. Mit Zurückrudern meine ich die Art, wie die rhythmischen Muster in der Bewegung umzukehren scheinen; zum Beispiel werden die 8er aufgebrochen zu 3-3-2 und dann zu 2-3-3. Mit Verzögerung beziehe ich mich auf die Art, wie die nächsten 8 aufgebrochen werden zu 2-2-1-3, zu einer Art stotternden Bewegung.

 

The opening melody of "Ko-Ko"

 

Schichtung ist einfach mein Begriff für den funkigen Charakter der Melodie und Maxs Begleitung. Bei dieser Musik achtete ich immer mehr auf die Melodie, das Schlagzeug und den Bass; allerdings besteht diese Form von Song ohnehin nur aus Melodie und Schlagzeug, wobei Maxs Part spontan komponiert ist. Die Art, wie Max die Besen über die Snare-Trommel fetzen lässt und dabei häufig an unvorhersehbaren Stellen schwenkt, verstärkt die Flüchtigkeit und Verfeinerung dieser Darbietung. Zum Beispiel bereitet Max während des Themas und während Miles erster Zwischenspiel-Improvisation (beginnend bei Takt 9) einen esoterischen Kommentar und füllt eine Menge mehr hinein, wenn Parker einsteigt (in Takt 17) – der Beat ist jedoch immer implizit vorhanden, nie direkt ausgedrückt. In dieser Interpretation von „Ko-Ko“ ist Birds Zeit-Gespür so stark, dass sein Spiel dem uneingeweihten Hörer/der Hörerin die Anhaltspunkte liefert, um seine/ihre Balance zu finden.

 

Melody of "Ko-Ko", trumpet, sax, snare & bass drum:


Man hört diese Art von Kommentar von Schlagzeugern selten, da viel von der heutigen Musik explizit ausgedrückt wird. Die Art, wie Max nur spezifische Teile der Melodie auswählt, um sie als Ansatzpunkte für seinen Kommentar zu nutzen, ist Teil dessen, was den Rhythmus so mysteriös macht. Vieles ist angedeutet, statt direkt ausgedrückt. Das setzt sich in den spontan komponierten Abschnitten dieser Darbietung fort, wo Yard in einer Weise spielt, bei der es sehr scharfe Akzente gibt, die ein Zusammenspiel mit Maxs großräumigen Ausrufen bilden. Die Schläge sind hier durchmischt, einige harte, einige sanfte, treppauf und treppab, in einer Art und Weise, die einen knallharten, aber unberechenbaren Groove bilden. Ich hab es immer so empfunden, dass die offenkundige Geschwindigkeit und Virtuosität dieser Musik ihre subtileren Dimensionen für viele Hörer verschleiert, fast so, dass nur die Eingeweihten einer Art Geheim-Orden sie verstehen können. Diese Art von Geschicklichkeit und Dialog setzt sich durch die gesamte Darbietung fort und gestaltet in einer Art und Weise, die auf- und abebbt, genau wie in einem Gespräch. Im Übrigen spielt Miles das F in Takt 28 zu früh; ausgehend von der Original-Studio-Aufnahme aus 1945, in der Diz [Dizzy Gillespie] und Bird die Melodie spielten, sollte das F auf den ersten Beat des Taktes 29 fallen. Yard und Max spielen ihre Parts korrekt, sodass der sich noch entwickelnde Miles Davis wahrscheinlich noch Probleme hatte, dieses rasante Tempo zu bewältigen.

 

Spontan komponierte Musik kann in einer ähnlichen Weise analysiert werden wie der Kontrapunkt - in Bezug auf die Interaktion der Stimmen. Es ist jedoch ein Kontrapunkt, der seine eigenen Regeln hat, und diese beruhen auf einer natürlichen Ordnung und intuitiven Logik – was der esoterische Gelehrte und Philosoph Schwaller de Lubicz auf die Intelligenz des Herzens bezog. Nach meiner Meinung sollte auch die kulturelle DNA der Schöpfer dieser Musik in Betracht gezogen werden, genauso wie man Umfeld und Kultur berücksichtigt, wenn man irgendwelche menschliche Bestrebungen studiert. Max neigt dazu, in einer Weise zu spielen, die sowohl Kommentare in Birds Pausen einwirft als auch Parkers Phrasen mit Abschluss-Figuren unterstreicht. Damit ein(e) Schlagzeuger(in) das effektiv machen kann, muss er/sie sehr vertraut sein mit der Sprechweise des Solisten, um die vielfältigen Äußerungen vorhersehen zu können.

 
Ich habe viele Live-Aufnahmen gehört, wo es eindeutig ist, dass Max Parkers Satz-Strukturen vorhersieht und die passenden Satzzeichen einsetzt. Das ist nicht ungewöhnlich; enge Freunde beenden häufig die Sätze des jeweils anderen in einem Gespräch. Bei Musikern wie Parker und Roach ist alles auf einer Reflex-Ebene internalisiert. Da diese Musik ein sich rasant bewegender Sound ist, der einigermaßen spontan geschaffen wird, glaube ich, dass die vordergründige mentale Aktivität hauptsächlich auf der semantischen Ebene des Verstandes abläuft, während die internalisierten, vereinbarten syntaktischen musikalischen Formationen von anderen, mehr automatisierten Prozessen gehandhabt werden – etwa jenen, die mit dem Spiegel-Neuronen-System theoretisch beschrieben werden. Verblüffend ist hier das Niveau, auf dem die Konversationen stattfinden – das sind sehr tiefgründige Subjekte! Die meiste Zeit diskutieren Kritiker und Akademiker diese Musik in Bezug auf individuelle musikalische Leistungen und konzentrieren sich zu wenig auf das Zusammenspiel. Nach meinem Empfinden erzählt diese Musik vor allen Dingen eine Geschichte. Da gibt es definitiv ein bewusstes Bestreben, die Musik unter Verwendung einer Gesprächs-Logik auszudrücken. Was ich also sage, ist, dass die Syntax zwar wichtig ist, die Semantik [Bedeutung der Zeichen] aber vorrangig ist. Zu oft wird ignoriert, wovon die Musik spricht oder sprechen mag.

 

Die letzte Hälfte der Bridge, die in die letzten 8 vor Roachs Solo führt (bei 1:32) liefert einen dieser rhythmischen Stimmführungs-Punkte, wo Max in dieses Boxer-Ding geht, indem er eine der funkigsten Sachen spielt, die ich gehört habe. Aufschlussreich sind auch die vokalen Ausrufe (von Musikern und möglicherweise einiger eingeweihter Mitglieder des Publikums), welche einen zusätzlichen Kommentar bilden. Es ist in diesem Abschnitt so viel los, dass man ein Buch darüber schreiben könnte; eine ganze Welt von Möglichkeiten ist impliziert, da die rhythmischen Beziehungen weit subtiler sind als das, was harmonisch geschieht.

 

2nd half of last bridge and last 8 of "Ko-Ko", Bird’s solo

 

Das führt vor Augen, dass Yard in diesen schnelleren Stücken dazu neigte, mit Ausstößen von Sätzen zu spielen, die mit kurzen internen Gruppierungen unter Verwendung scharfer Akzente interpunktiert [mit Satzzeichen versehen] sind, während Max in einer Weise spielte, die Parkers Phrasen mit längeren Gruppierungen, die wechselnde epitritische*  Muster aufbauen, effektiv abgrenzt. Max erzeugt diese Muster mit wiederholten Figuren, die dafür ausgelegt sind, beim Hörer den Eindruck von einer speziellen rhythmischen Form hervorzurufen, nur um dann plötzlich die rhythmische Form, die der Hörer zu erwarten konditioniert ist, zu ersetzen. Die oben erwähnte Passage ist ein perfektes Beispiel dafür: Er erzeugt einen hypnotischen Tanz von 2-3-3, nur um das erwartete Gleichgewicht mit der Antwort 2-1-3-1-1 zu ersetzen und dann mit einer geringfügigen Variation des ursprünglichen Tanzes fortzufahren.

 

Sogar die vokalen Ausrufe von Musikern und Mitgliedern des Publikums beteiligen sich an dem, was ich als eine weltliche ritualisierte Darbietung betrachte. All die Eigenschaften, die ich erwähnt habe, sind Charakterzüge, die ich als eine Art musikalische DNA betrachte, die aus Afrika erhalten blieb. Der Verfeinerungs-Grad dieser Musik verlangt sowohl die intellektuelle als auch die emotionale Beteiligung der Musiker sowie der Nicht-Musiker (wenn sie in die Musik gelangen können, was nicht alle Leute können). Auch die Änderungsrate eines jeden Instruments ist aufschlussreich. Offensichtlich sind die Solisten im Vordergrund, die jene Instrumente spielen, die die flinkere Bewegung haben. Im Fall dieser speziellen Gruppe bewegt sich der Bass ungefähr mit der halben Geschwindigkeit des Solisten, während das Schlagzeug eine lebhafte und vielgestaltige Funktion hat. In Bezug auf Kommentare ist der Schlagzeuger der nächst langsamste nach Bass und Piano und er liefert den langsamsten Kommentar, aus einem rhythmischen Gesichtspunkt betrachtet. Allerdings sind Elemente des Schlagzeug-Parts näher an der Geschwindigkeit des Solisten.

 

* Das epitritische Verhältnis ist 4 gegen 3; das heißt, Max spielt die 4 gegen eine langsame 3 (d.h. einen langsamen Puls, der in jedem 3. Takt des 1/1-Taktes schlägt). Dieses Verhältnis wird auf dem afrikanischen Kontinent verwendet.

 

Rezensent: Steve Coleman

 

 

Zurück zum Inhaltsverzeichnis von Coleman über Parker

 

 

Kontakt / Offenlegung