Zurück zum Inhaltsverzeichnis von Coleman über Parker        

 

Charlie Parker & Dizzy Gillespie: Confirmation

 

Track: Confirmation

 

Artist: Charlie Parker (alto sax) and Dizzy Gillespie (trumpet)

 

CD: Diz 'n' Bird at Carnegie Hall (Blue Note 57061)

 

Musicians:
 Charlie Parker (alto sax), Dizzy Gillespie (trumpet), John Lewis (piano), Al McKibbon (bass), Joe Harris (drums).

Composed by Charlie Parker.

 

Recorded: Carnegie Hall, New York, September 29, 1947

 

 

The melody itself is a theory lesson. So much subtle detail is involved that it is rarely played this way by modern musicians. Parker normally soloed first when he played with Dizzy, Birks said it was because when Parker played first, he (Diz) was inspired to play at his best. What's extraordinary is not only Parker's virtuosity, but the fluidity of his ideas and how they proceed from one to the next in such a conversational manner. Again Bird only takes three choruses, but he tells an epic story in this short period of time.

 

There is a lot of cramming in this spontaneous composition. Cramming is a term I first heard used by Dizzy in his autobiography To Be Or Not To Bop when he talked about Parker squeezing a longer rapid phrase into a smaller time space, a phrase that was not simply double time but some other unusual rhythmic relationship to the pulse. There is plenty of it in this version of "Confirmation," and not all of it rapid. Bird had the ability to land on his feet like a cat after playing some of the most outrageous rhythmic phrases. But the key to what Yard was doing was his incredible time feel, so smooth that the phrases do not even feel odd in any way. In fact, most of the players who imitate his style have far less rhythmic variety in their playing. Obviously the impression that they get from Parker's playing is that he is playing a steady stream of notes, all of the same rhythmic value. But nothing could be farther from the truth. Again, the conversational aspect of Yard's playing is always on display, the way he is always in dialog with himself, even when there is not much in the way of dialog coming from his accompanists (as is the case in this recording).

 

 

My analysis here comes mostly from a rhetorical and affections perspective which deals with the poetics of the music. This perspective is the one most stressed in the African-American community.

 

Parker opens with a very strong melodic statement. I love the way Bird plays in sentences that straddle the square (every 2 or 4 beats) progression of the harmony. Bird's statements flow right through several tonal changes, his sentences mutating and reflecting the changing tonalities as they move, while still being very strong melodies, perfectly balanced. His statements make perfect intuitive melodic sense to the uninitiated listener while simultaneously providing worlds of sophisticated information for experienced musicians. The exclamation starting at the second measure of the second eight is incredibly vocal and moves into a blues-tinged statement. This second eight section ends with a very strong melodic sentence at 1:09 that terminates with a dominant-subdominant-tonic melodic progression, instead of the normal dominant-tonic motion. Parker normally has strong ending statements just before the bridges, but these terminating statements traverse an incredible variety of harmonic paths.

 

 

The feeling of the bridge is like when another person interjects with a different subject, or adds another part to the story. Of course this is what occurs harmonically as well, but I am referring here only to the character of Parker's melodic statements—it's almost as if another person is talking at this point. These statements then get resolved going into the last eight of this first chorus, as if returning to the original speaker. This first chorus concludes with a very strong closing melodic statement that sums up the previous statements, which may be the quote to some standard that I don't know. I've always heard this last phrase at 1:32 as saying, "Well..., but it's always gonna be like that."

 

 

The beginning of the second chorus responds with "but you know we've gotta keep on goin'," which is my personal interpretation of this response to the end of the first chorus. This second chorus is by far the most involved and complex part of this story, and this middle chorus feels like the meat of the story. I noticed that the most complex passages come in the second eight and the bridge of this second chorus; these sections are symmetrically right in the middle of this entire spontaneous composition! Now, either Bird planned it this way or he has a hell of an intuition in terms of form—or both. There are several advanced rhythmic devices, double-timing, rhymes (the phrase at 1:38 rhymes with the phrase at 1:41), and backpedaling phrasing from the offbeats (1:46). The double-timing phrases that begin inside the fourth measure of the second eight (1:52) still contains all the rhythmic complexity and clave-like phrasing that Parker is known for; however, the accuracy of these lightning fast statements is absolutely frightening! This hyper phrase ends in a question, both harmonically (in the form of a secondary dominant) and melodically (the rise of the melody at this point). It's answered moments later with a bluesy statement, a rising subdominant—descending whole-tone dominant phrase.

 

 

Second Chorus – second 8 of "Confirmation":

 

 

 

These complex double-time statements continue in the bridge and represent the height of the story. The opening melody of the bridge moves through several unusual tonal areas which I hear as:

 

   / / / /     /   /   /     /      /          /          /     /      / / / /
|| Cmin | Dbmin6 F7 | Bbmaj Ebmaj Bbmaj | Bbmaj |

 

This Cmin to Dbmin6 to F7 progression was something that Parker played often, but it's one of those esoteric dominant progressions which never caught on among the majority of musicians who were influenced by Bird. It really says something about the level of Yard's intuition that he could arrive at such a progression seemingly by feeling and ear alone, although I am by no means certain that this was the approach he used.

 

Second Chorus Bridge of "Confirmation":

 

 

 

The last eight continues the conversational style established in the first chorus, a strong melodic statement that is answered by one of those "do you know what I mean" or "understand what I'm sayin'" phrases (2:14). The last closing statement of this chorus sounds like a rhetorical question, which Yard leaves open for the interjections and constant commentary of the musicians to become part of the conversation, just as if in church.

 

The entire third chorus feels like a summation of what went before. The first eight begins with a question, followed at 2:27 with a bluesy partial response, completed with a typical Lydian secondary dominant expression followed by one of those "understand what I'm sayin'" phrases at 2:33. The following fragmented statement beginning at the end of the first measure of the second eight takes the form of a question-answer within a question. The smoother response at 2:28 is answered by an ending which, in contrast to the ending of the second eight of the first chorus, concludes with a statement that moves subdominant-minor subdominant (what I call negative dominant)-tonic (2:40).

 

 

The entire story seems to begin to come to a definite close with the three sentences in the bridge of this chorus, some of the most beautifully crafted phrases in this entire performance. The last eight, after an angular sentence that briefly hangs before moving to the subdominant, finishes with a bird-like flurry that has the sound of someone walking away mumbling disjunct statements, not quite correct English, but perfectly reflecting the way people normally converse. All of this is an example of Parker's very conversational style.

 

Reviewer: Steve Coleman

 

 

Charlie Parker & Dizzy Gillespie: Confirmation

 

Track: Confirmation

 

Artist: Charlie Parker (alto sax) and Dizzy Gillespie (trumpet)

 

CD: Diz 'n' Bird at Carnegie Hall (Blue Note 57061)

 

Musicians:
 Charlie Parker (alto sax), Dizzy Gillespie (trumpet), John Lewis (piano), Al McKibbon (bass), Joe Harris (drums).

 

Composed by Charlie Parker.

 

Recorded: Carnegie Hall, New York, September 29, 1947

 

 

Die Melodie selbst ist eine Theorie-Lehrstunde. Es ist so viel an subtilen Details enthalten, dass sie in dieser Weise von modernen Musikern selten gespielt wird. Parker solierte normalerweise als Erster, wenn er mit Dizzy spielte, sagte Birks [John Birks ‚Dizzy‘ Gillespie], denn wenn Parker zuerst spielte, wurde Diz [Dizzy] dazu inspiriert, sein Bestes zu geben. Außergewöhnlich ist hier nicht nur Parkers Virtuosität, sondern auch die Flüssigkeit seiner Ideen und wie sie in solch gesprächsartiger Weise von einer zur nächsten fortschreiten. Wiederum spielt Bird nur drei Chorusse, aber er erzählt in dieser kurzen Zeitspanne eine epische Geschichte.

 

Es gibt in dieser spontanen Komposition eine Menge „Vollstopfen“ [Cramming]. „Vollstopfen“ ist ein Begriff, den ich zum ersten Mal in Dizzys Autobiographie „To Be Or Not To Bop“ las, wo er davon sprach, dass Parker eine längere rasante Phrase in einen kürzeren Zeitraum quetschte, eine Phrase, die nicht einfach doppelt so schnell ist, sondern ein anderes, ungewöhnliches Verhältnis zum Puls hat. Es gibt davon in dieser Version von „Confirmation“ eine Menge, wobei nicht alle rasant sind. Bird hatte die Fähigkeit, auf seinen Füßen wie eine Katze zu landen, nachdem er die ungeheuerlichsten rhythmischen Phrasen gespielt hat. Der Schlüssel zu dem, was Yard [Spitzname von Parker] gemacht hat, war sein unglaubliches Zeitgefühl, so geschmeidig, dass sich die Phrasen nicht einmal in irgendeiner Weise seltsam anfühlen. Die meisten Spieler, die seinen Stil imitieren, haben hingegen weit weniger rhythmische Vielfalt in ihrem Spiel. Offensichtlich ist der Eindruck, den sie von Parkers Spiel erhalten, der, dass er einen gleichförmigen Strom aus Noten spielt, die alle den selben rhythmischen Wert haben. Aber nichts könnte weiter von der Wahrheit entfernt sein. Noch einmal: Der Gesprächs-Aspekt von Yards Spiel ist immer offensichtlich, die Art, wie er stets in einem Dialog steht, selbst mit sich selbst, wenn nicht viel an Dialog von seinen Begleitern kommt (wie es bei dieser Aufnahme der Fall ist).

 

Meine Analyse ergibt sich überwiegend aus einer rhetorischen und affektiven Perspektive, bei der es um die Poetik der Musik geht. Diese Perspektive ist die in der afro-amerikanischen Community am meisten betonte.

 

Parker eröffnet mit einem sehr starken melodischen Statement. Ich liebe die Art, wie Bird in Sätzen spielt, die die viereckige (alle 2 oder 4 Beats) Progression der Harmonie überspannt. Birds Statements fließen durch mehrere tonale Wechsel, seine Sätze verändern sich und reflektieren die wechselnden Tonalitäten, während sie sich bewegen und dennoch sehr starke, perfekt ausbalancierte Melodien bilden. Seine Statements ergeben für den uneingeweihten Hörer perfekten intuitiven melodischen Sinn, während sie gleichzeitig für die erfahrenen Musiker Welten der verfeinerten Information liefern. Der im 2. Takt der 2. Achter beginnende Ausruf ist unglaublich vokal und führt zu einem Blues-gefärbten Statement. Dieser 2. Achter-Abschnitt endet bei 1:09 mit einem sehr starken melodischen Satz, der mit einer Dominante-Subdominante-Tonika--Melodie-Progression abschließt, statt mit einer normalen Dominante-Tonika-Bewegung. Parker hat normalerweise starke End-Statements direkt vor den Bridges, aber diese abschließenden Statements durchlaufen eine unglaubliche Vielfalt von harmonischen Pfaden.

   

Das Feeling der Bridge ist so, als würde eine andere Person ein anderes Thema einwerfen oder einen anderen Teil der Geschichte hinzufügen. Das geschieht natürlich auch in harmonischer Hinsicht, doch beziehe ich mich hier nur auf den Charakter von Parkers melodischen Statements – es ist beinahe so, als würde an diesem Punkt eine andere Person sprechen. Diese Statements werden dann beim Übergehen in die letzten Achter dieses ersten Chorus aufgelöst, als würden sie zum ursprünglichen Sprecher zurückkehren. Dieser erste Chorus schließt mit einem sehr starken abschließenden melodischen Statement, das die vorhergehenden Statements zusammenfasst und ein Zitat von irgendeinem Standard sein könnte, den ich nicht kenne. Ich habe diese letzte Phrase bei 1:32 so gehört, als würde sie sagen: „Well..., but it's always gonna be like that." [Gut …, aber es wird immer irgendwie so sein]

 

Der Beginn des zweiten Chorus antwortet mit "but you know we've gotta keep on goin'" [aber du weißt, wir müssen weitergehen] – das ist meine persönliche Interpretation dieser Antwort auf das Ende des ersten Chorus. Dieser zweite Chorus ist bei weitem der vertrackteste und komplexeste Teil dieser Geschichte und dieser mittlere Chorus fühlt sich wie das „Fleisch“ der Geschichte an. Ich stellte fest, dass die komplexesten Passagen in den zweiten Achtern und der Bridge dieses zweiten Chorus auftreten; diese Abschnitte sind symmetrisch genau in der Mitte dieser gesamten spontanen Komposition! Nun, entweder plante Bird es so oder er hatte eine Wahnsinns-Intuition hinsichtlich der Form – oder beides. Es gibt mehrere hochentwickelte rhythmische Bauelemente, Verdoppelungen des Tempos, Reime (die Phrase bei 1:38 reimt sich mit der Phrase bei 1:41) und zurückrudernde Phrasierung von den Offbeats (1:46). Die Phrasen in doppeltem Tempo, die innerhalb des 4. Takts der zweiten Achter beginnt (1:52), enthalten trotzdem all die rhythmische Komplexität und Clave-ähnliche Phrasierung, für die Parker bekannt ist. Die Akkuratesse dieser blitzschnellen Statements ist dennoch erschreckend! Diese Hyper-Phrase endet in einer Frage, sowohl harmonisch (in der Form einer zweiten Dominante) als auch melodisch (das Ansteigen der Melodie an diesem Punkt). Sie wird einige Momente später mit einem bluesigen Statement beantwortet, einer aufsteigenden-Subdominante-absteigenden-Ganz-Ton-Dominanten-Phrase.

 

 

Zweiter Chorus – zweite 8 von „Confirmation“:

 

 

Diese komplexen Doppel-Tempo-Statements setzen sich in der Bridge fort und repräsentieren den Höhepunkt der Geschichte. Die eröffnende Melodie der Bridge führt durch mehrere unübliche tonale Bereiche, die ich höre als:

 

     / / / /         /   /   /        /         /          /          /     /      / / / /
|| C-Moll | Des-Moll-6 F7 | B-Dur Es-Durj B-Dur | B-Dur |

 

Diese Progression von C-Moll zu Des-Moll-6 und F7 war etwas, was Parker oft spielte, sie war aber eine dieser esoterischen Dominanten-Progressionen, die bei der Mehrheit der von Bird beeinflussten Musiker nie Schule machte. Es sagt wirklich etwas über das Niveau von Yards Intuition aus, dass er anscheinend allein durch Feeling und Hören bei einer solchen Progression anlangen konnte, wobei ich mir allerdings keineswegs sicher bin, dass dies der Zugang war, den er benützte.

   

Bridge des zweiten Chorus von „Confirmation“:

 

 

Der letzte Achter setzt den Gesprächs-artigen Stil fort, der im ersten Chorus etabliert wurde – ein starkes melodisches Statement, das von einem dieser „do you know what I mean“-Phrasen [weißt du, was ich meine] oder „understand what I’m sayin’“-Phrasen [verstehst‘, was ich sage] beantwortet wird. Das letzte, abschließende Statement dieses Chorus klingt wie eine rhetorische Frage, die Yard offen lässt für die Einwürfe und ständigen Kommentare der Musiker, damit sie Teil des Gespräches werden, genau wie in der Kirche.

 

Der gesamte dritte Chorus fühlt sich wie eine Zusammenfassung von dem, was zuvor ablief, an. Der erste Achter beginnt mit einer Frage, gefolgt von einer bluesigen teilweisen Antwort bei 2:27, vervollständigt mit einer typischen lydischen Zweite-Dominante-Äußerung, gefolgt von einer dieser „understand what I’m sayin’“-Phrasen [verstehst‘, was ich sage] bei 2:33. Das folgende fragmentierte Statement, das am Ende des ersten Takts des zweiten Achters beginnt, nimmt innerhalb einer Frage die Form einer Frage-Antwort an. Die sanftere Antwort bei 2:28 wird von einer Endung beantwortet, die (im Gegensatz zur Endung der zweiten Achter des ersten Chorus) mit einem Statement mit folgender Fortschreitung abschließt: Subdominante - Moll-Subdominante (was ich „negative Dominante“ nenne) – Tonika (2:40).

   

Die gesamte Geschichte scheint mit den drei Sätzen in der Bridge dieses Chorus allmählich zu einem endgültigen Ende zu kommen, einigen der am schönsten ausgearbeiteten Phrasen in der gesamten Performance. Der letzte Achter (nach einem schrägen Satz, der kurz hängt, bevor er in die Subdominante geht) beendet mit einem Vogel-artigen Windstoß, der den Sound von jemandem hat, der unzusammenhängende Statements murmelnd weggeht, in nicht ganz korrektem Englisch, aber perfekt die Art spiegelnd, in der Leute normalerweise sprechen. All das ist ein Beispiel für Parkers sehr Gesprächs-artigem Stil.

 

Rezensent: Steve Coleman

 

 

Zurück zum Inhaltsverzeichnis von Coleman über Parker

 

 

Kontakt / Offenlegung