Zurück zum Inhaltsverzeichnis von Coleman über Parker        

 

Charlie Parker: Funky Blues

 

Track: Funky Blues

Artist: Charlie Parker (alto sax)

CD: Jam Session (Verve 833564)

Musicians: Charlie Parker (alto sax), Charlie Shavers (trumpet), Benny Carter (alto sax), Johnny Hodges (alto sax), Ben Webster (tenor sax), Oscar Peterson (piano), Barney Kessel (guitar), Ray Brown (bass), Flip Phillips (tenor sax), J.C. Heard (drums). Composed by Johnny Hodges.

Recorded: Hollywood, CA, July 1952

 

 

This performance highlights the difference between Parker's form of expression on the blues in contrast to the approaches that came before him. I am indebted to saxophone master Von Freeman for initially pointing out these observations.

 

Obviously this recording was altered to highlight the differences between these players, as Hodges and Carter were the two major alto saxophone stylists during the era before Parker arrived on the scene. Based on the jump in tempo after Bird's statement, you can hear that the original recording was edited so that Benny Carter's statement would follow Bird's. Clearly, this was not how it was originally recorded.

 

The two older alto saxophonists are East Coast players; Hodges from Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Carter from New York City. During that time, a player's musical style seemed to reflect the region of the country they came from; regional differences seemed more pronounced than they are today. Of course, these differences had little to do with the level of musicianship, but they did seem to show up in some of the stylistic tendencies of the players. This is not at all meant as a critique. I only wish to point out that each of these players had different approaches to the Blues idiom, and some of that was a reflection of which area of the country they came from.

 

 

Bird was a blues player by nature. In terms of emotional content Parker was not very different from other blues players from this part of the country (south Midwest). However, what Parker introduced to the music was a level of hip sophistication that generally had not been previously expressed in this musical form. Tenor saxophonist Von Freeman calls it the university blues, versus what came before. What he is referring to is the ability to preach while simultaneously being able to interject very sophisticated melodic voice-leading. This performance by Parker is a clear example, although there are many. The preaching begins right from the outset, complete with exclamations and repeated gestures for emphasis. Bird's clear and self-assured, hard-edged sound, lacking in the exaggerated vibrato of the earlier stylists, already signals a markedly different approach to the blues, one in which the inflections are more subtle than in the previous era.

 

 

This first appearance of more complex voice-leading occurs at the beginning of what's called the turnback (2:28), a pivot area in the seventh through eighth measures that progresses from the subdominant through the tonic and dominant areas, then back towards the subdominant, where Bird's spontaneous melody perfectly follows Ray Brown's bass line. The cadential target on the upbeat of the end middle of this phrase (2:30) rhymes with the target upbeat cadence at the end (2:34) via the adroit use of contour and paraphrase. The next phrase flips the cadential targets from upbeat to downbeat, while simultaneously slightly lengthening the cadences, in a motion leading to the tonic. However, immediately upon touching the tonic, Bird progresses to the subdominant. This chorus ends with a blues-tinged afterthought.

 

The second chorus begins with a miniature version of a classic blues form, against the background chorus of the other horns functioning as the congregation to Bird's preaching. The opening phrase is repeated three times in an I don't believe ya heard me form, with the middle phrase as the darker lunar expression (i.e., subdominant). After this bluesy statement, beginning in the fourth measure, Bird, in a whispering statement that feels like an explanation, shifts gears into a level of sophistication rarely heard in the blues of this time. In the sixth measure (3:07), Parker literally falls out of this mode of playing, through an alternate tonal path in the form of a descending semi-pentatonic figure, again melodically shadowing Brown's bass line with sophisticated rising and falling voice-leading in the crucial pivoting area of seventh and eighth measures, hitting every passing tonality while still maintaining his melodic emphasis. Moving into the tenth measure (3:19), Parker again shifts into the overdrive, ascending as a light color, squeezing out the top of the line, descending using shifting darker hues, then moving towards the subdominant before doubling back on a darker dominant path towards the tonic.

 

 

 

Normally, this level of detail was not expressed prior to Parker's arrival on the scene (of course there were exceptions like Art Tatum and Don Byas). The piano players at that time generally knew more about harmony than most of the horn players, but these pianists usually expressed this level of detail as chordal figures, not intricate melodic figures. In Parker's case, the sophistication is expressed in the form of extremely melodic and expressive voice-like phrases, not simply as basic patterns.

 

I believe that one key to Bird's melodic concept is that each individual part of every phrase is a melody in miniature, a fractal-like concept where even the smaller melodic segments are balanced melodically within themselves. This is coupled with an uncanny ability to utilize what I call connectants, small chain-like phrases or hooks (not in the sense of today's popular music) that are used to connect the melodic cells through a complicated process analogous to weaving or the peptide bonds that connect amino acids in RNA chains. Bird had a strong sense of the nature of melody, from its more primitive constituents to a more universal point of view.

 

 

Parker's innate sense of balance was incredible, as is clearly demonstrated at the end of this solo. Whereas most players today with his level of technique would feel a need to follow the harmony explicitly, Bird is able to suggest the voice-lead just with the shape of his pentatonic and diatonic line, using a well developed sense of just where to rhythmically place the tones that lead by proximity to the target pitches that express the passing tonalities. With Parker it is the melodic contour and path which rules supreme, not the tones in a particular chord. The difference is subtle.

 

 

 

 

Finally, I would like to state that I think of these slow versions of the blues as examples of secular rituals. In much West African music there is this constant interplay of 3 communing with 2, an intimate marriage of the ternary feel (called perfect meter in medieval times because it was related to the Trinity) and the duple feel (imperfect meter). The intervals of the Perfect Fifth and Perfect Fourth were called perfect for this same reason, as they were associated with the number 3, considered perfect since ancient times. This was also true in early European music. For example, the metered sections of some Notre Dame organum as well as some of the secular music of medieval times was typically governed by rhythmic modes which were all expressed in triple meter to symbolize the Trinity. So in some ways, this connects to what Dizzy called Parker's Sanctified Rhythms.

 

 

 

If you listen carefully to Parker's opening phrase, it is almost completely in a kind of ternary feel, and this is true of the most blues-inflected parts of his performance. Other slow blues that he performed (for example "Cosmic Rays") exhibit this same tendency.

 

 

Reviewer: Steve Coleman

 

Charlie Parker: Funky Blues

 

Track: Funky Blues

Artist: Charlie Parker (alto sax)

CD: Jam Session (Verve 833564)

Musicians: Charlie Parker (alto sax), Charlie Shavers (trumpet), Benny Carter (alto sax), Johnny Hodges (alto sax), Ben Webster (tenor sax), Oscar Peterson (piano), Barney Kessel (guitar), Ray Brown (bass), Flip Phillips (tenor sax), J.C. Heard (drums). Composed by Johnny Hodges.

Recorded: Hollywood, CA, July 1952

 

 

Diese Aufnahme zeigt den Unterschied zwischen Parkers Art, den Blues auszudrücken, zu den Herangehensweisen, die vor ihm entstanden. Ich verdanke es dem Saxofon-Meister Von Freeman, auf diese Beobachtungen hingewiesen worden zu sein.

 

Diese Aufnahme wurde offensichtlich verändert, um die Unterschiede zwischen diesen Musikern aufzuzeigen, von denen Hodges und Carter die beiden führenden Alt-Saxofon-Stilisten in der Ära vor Parkers Erscheinen auf der Szene waren. Am Einstiegs-[Jump-in]-Tempo nach Birds Statement kann man hören, dass die Original-Aufnahme so geschnitten wurde, dass Benny Carters Solo auf Birds Solo folgt. Das wurde eindeutig ursprünglich nicht so aufgenommen.

 

Die beiden älteren Alt-Saxofonisten waren Ost-Küsten-Musiker; Hodges aus Cambridge, Massachusetts, und Carter aus New York City. Damals schien der musikalische Stil eines Musikers die Region des Landes, aus der er kam, zu reflektieren. Regionale Unterschiede schienen ausgeprägter gewesen zu sein als heute. Diese Unterschiede hatten natürlich wenig mit dem Grad des musikalischen Könnens zu tun, aber sie schienen sich tatsächlich in gewissen stilistischen Tendenzen der Musiker zu zeigen. Das ist in keiner Weise als Kritik gemeint. Ich möchte nur darauf hinweisen, dass jeder dieser Musiker einen anderen Zugang zum Blues-Idiom hatte und einiges davon ein Spiegelbild jenes Teils des Landes war, aus dem er kam. 

 

Bird war von Natur aus ein Blues-Musiker. Hinsichtlich des emotionalen Inhalts unterschied sich Parker wenig von anderen Blues-Musikern aus diesem Teil des Landes (südlicher Mittelwesten). Was Parker aber in die Musik eingeführt hat, war ein Grad an hipper Verfeinerung (Sophistication), die zuvor im Allgemeinen nicht in dieser musikalischen Form ausgedrückt worden war. Der Tenor-Saxofonist Von Freeman nennt es den Universitäts-Blues, im Gegensatz zu dem, was zuvor kam. Er bezieht sich damit auf die Fähigkeit, zu predigen und zugleich eine sehr verfeinerte melodische Stimmführung einzuwerfen. Diese Aufnahme von Parker ist ein gutes Beispiel dafür (obgleich es dafür viele Beispiele gibt). Das Predigen beginnt gleich am Anfang, einschließlich Aufschreie und wiederholter Gesten der Emphase. Birds klarer und selbstsicherer, scharfer, kantiger Klang, ohne dem übertriebenen Vibrato der früheren Stilisten, signalisiert bereits einen deutlich anderen Zugang zum Blues - einen Zugang, in dem der Tonfall (die Beugungen, Biegungen) subtiler ist als in der vorhergehenden Ära.

 

Dieses erste Auftreten einer komplexeren Stimmführung findet sich zu Beginn dessen, was Turnback (2:28) genannt wird, ein Drehpunkt-Abschnitt im 7. bis 8. Takt, der von der Subdominante bis zur Tonika und Dominante und dann wieder zurück zur Subdominante schreitet, wo Birds spontane Melodie perfekt Ray Browns Bass-Linie folgt. Das Ziel der Kadenz auf dem Upbeat der Mitte dieser Phrase (2:30) reimt sich mit der Ziel-Upbeat-Kadenz am Ende (2:34) durch die geschickte Verwendung von Kontur und Paraphrase. Die nächste Phrase wechselt die Kadenz-Ziele vom Upbeat zum Downbeat, wobei gleichzeitig die Kadenzen in einer Bewegung, die zur Tonika führt, leicht verlängert werden. Doch kaum hat er die Tonika berührt, schreitet Bird zur Subdominante. Dieser Chorus endet mit einem Blues-gefärbtem Nachsatz.

 

 

Der zweite Chorus beginnt mit einer Miniatur-Version einer klassischen Blues-Form vor dem Hintergrund-Chor der anderen Blasinstrumente, die als Gemeinde zu Birds Predigt dienen. Die Eröffnungs-Phrase wird dreimal gespielt in einer Form von „Ich glaub, ihr habt mich nicht gehört“, mit der mittleren Phrase als dem dunkleren Mond-Ausdruck (d.h. Subdominante). Nach diesem bluesigen Statement wechselt Bird den Gang (beginnend im 4. Takt) in ein flüsterndes Statement, das sich wie eine Erläuterung anfühlt und einen Grad der Verfeinerung hat, der im damaligen Blues selten zu hören war. Im 6. Takt (3:07) fällt Parker buchstäblich aus dieser Spielweise, indem er einen alternativen tonalen Weg in der Form einer absteigenden halb-pentatonischen Figur geht, dabei wiederum Browns Bass-Linie mit verfeinerter aufsteigender und fallender Stimmführung im entscheidenden Drehpunkt-Abschnitt des 7. und 8. Taktes melodisch beschattet und dabei jede vorbeiziehende Tonalität trifft, während er weiterhin seinen melodischen Schwerpunkt aufrecht hält. Bei der Bewegung in den 10. Takt (3:19) wechselt Parker nochmals in den Schnellgang, steigt dabei auf wie eine helle Farbe, quetscht das Spitzenmäßige heraus, steigt unter Verwendung wechselnder dunklerer Farbtöne herunter und geht dann zur Subdominante, bevor er auf einem dunkleren Weg zur Tonika zurück geht.

 

Normalerweise wurde dieser Grad an Details vor Parkers Erscheinen auf der Szene nicht ausgedrückt (auch wenn es Ausnahmen wie Art Tatum und Don Byas gab). Die Pianisten wussten damals im Allgemeinen mehr über Harmonie als die meisten Bläser, aber diese Pianisten drückten diesen Grad an Details üblicherweise in Akkord-Figuren aus, nicht in komplizierten melodischen Figuren. Bei Parker wird die Verfeinerung in Form extrem melodischer und expressiver stimmähnlicher Phrasen ausgedrückt, nicht bloß in grundlegenden Mustern.

 

Ich glaube, dass ein Schlüssel zu Birds melodischem Konzept darin liegt, dass jeder einzelne Teil jeder Phrase eine Melodie in Miniatur ist - eine Art fraktales Konzept, in dem sogar die kleineren melodischen Segmente in sich melodisch ausbalanciert sind. Das ist mit einer unheimlichen Fähigkeit gekoppelt, das anzuwenden, was ich Verbinder nenne, kleine kettenartige Phrasen oder Haken (nicht im Sinne heutiger Pop-Musik), die verwendet werden, um die melodischen Elemente in einem komplizierten Prozess zu verbinden - analog zum Weben oder den Peptid-Bindungen, die die Aminosäuren in RNA-Ketten verbinden. Bird hatte einen starken Sinn für das Wesen der Melodie – von den urwüchsigen Komponenten bis zu einem universelleren Blickwinkel.

 

Parkers angeborenes Gespür für Balance war unglaublich, wie sich am Ende dieses Solos klar zeigt. Während die meisten heutigen Musiker mit seinem Grad an Technik es als notwendig empfinden würden, der Harmonie explizit zu folgen, ist Bird in der Lage, die [harmonische Leitlinie] einfach mit der Gestalt seiner pentatonischen oder diatonischen Linie anzudeuten, wobei er ein gut entwickeltes Gespür dafür einsetzt, wo jene Töne rhythmisch platziert werden, die durch ihre Nähe zu den Ziel-Ton-Höhen (die die vorbeiziehenden Tonalitäten ausdrücken) leiten. Bei Parker sind es die melodische Kontur und der Weg, die an oberster Stelle regieren, nicht die Töne in einem bestimmten Akkord. Der Unterschied ist subtil.

 

Schließlich möchte ich sagen, dass ich diese langsamen Versionen des Blues als ein Beispiel für weltliche Rituale ansehe. In vieler west-afrikanischer Musik gibt es dieses konstante Zusammenspiel von 3 kommunizierend mit 2, eine innige Ehe des ternären Gefühls (in mittelalterlichen Zeiten perfekte Mensur genannt, weil es auf die Dreifaltigkeit bezogen wurde) mit dem Zweier-Gefühl (imperfekte Mensur). Die Intervalle der reinen Quinte und reinen Quart wurden aus dem selben Grund perfekt genannt, weil sie mit der Zahl 3 assoziiert wurden, und seit antiken Zeiten als perfekt betrachtet. Das galt auch in früher europäischer Musik. Zum Beispiel waren die metrischen Unterteilungen sowohl von jedem Notre-Dame-Organum also auch von einigem der weltlichen Musik der mittelalterlichen Zeiten typischerweise von rhythmischen Modi beherrscht, die alle in Dreier-Metren ausgedrückt wurden, um die Dreifaltigkeit zu symbolisieren. In gewisser Weise schließt das also an das an, was Dizzy und Parker geheiligte Rhythmen nannten.

 

Wenn man Parkers eröffnende Phrase genau anhört, so ist sie fast völlig in einer Art von ternärem Gefühl und das gilt für die meisten blues-gebeugten (flektierten; linguistisch) Teile seiner Darbietung. Andere langsame Blues, die er gespielt hat (zum Beispiel "Cosmic Rays"), weisen die selbe Tendenz auf.

 

Rezensent: Steve Coleman

 

 

 

 

Zurück zum Inhaltsverzeichnis von Coleman über Parker

 

 

Kontakt / Offenlegung